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4 Questions for 100,000 Hours

The founders of volunteerism hub KidsThatDoGood.com have set an ambitious goal for this year: to log one hundred thousand hours of community service on their website. Here are their answers to why and how they’re going to make it happen.

 

WHAT IS THE 100,000 HOURS INITIATIVE?

We started Kids That Do Good with the goal of helping kids like us who want to make a difference in the world.  in the last few months since we launched, a whole community has registered on the site, and we wanted to find a way to let everyone see how much we can accomplish, working together.  We’ve got a meter on the site that keeps track of all our hours of service, and we thought it would be more fun if we set a target so everyone can watch our progress.

 

100,000 IS A LOT OF HOURS. HOW WILL YOU REACH YOUR GOAL?

It’s all about getting the community to work together.  If we can get a thousand kids and adults registered on the site, that’s only about eight hours of service a month; a little more than two hours a week.  We figure most people already do something good for someone else two hours a week—and if they don’t, they should.  Now we just want to get them to log them on the site and watch it snowball.  It’s like one good turn encourages another.

 

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE?

Anyone. That’s why Kids That Do Good was started: to help kids, and adults, find ways to make a difference. And it’s easy. Every time you participate in community service, just go to the website and enter the hours you contributed. Then watch the ‘good meter’ rise, and feel good about yourself, and all of us!

 

WHAT DOES ‘GOOD’ LOOK LIKE? WHAT KIND OF ACTIVITIES COUNT?

Good can look like a lot of things; what’s important is what Good feels like. Any time that you volunteer counts toward our goal, whether the cause is listed on our website or not. You can log hours for time that you volunteer in lots of ways: helping an elderly or disabled neighbor; participating in a walk-a-thon, or sponsoring a food drive for a local homeless shelter. It’s not the organization that counts, it’s the people who you’re helping.

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